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Education Bills

Sanborn NH librarian Pam Harland: “Higher standards challenge everyone, but teachers & parents alike appreciate it.”

Sanborn NH librarian Pam Harland: “Higher standards challenge everyone, but teachers & parents alike appreciate it.”

Pam Harland is the past-president of the NH School Library Media Association and a librarian at Sanborn Regional High School. She testified in “strong” opposition to SB 101 because, “it uses the principal of local control to make a negative statement about the Common Core, the best educational change I’ve seen in my 20 years […]

Retired teacher Betsey Phillips: “We have local control in NH–and local schools willingly adopted the Common Core because it works.”

Retired teacher Betsey Phillips: “We have local control in NH–and local schools willingly adopted the Common Core because it works.”

Betsey Phillips is a retired elementary school teacher from Franconia.  She testified in opposition to  SB 101 because the Common Core standards “have been adopted by most all of the school systems in NH and it is going well.”

Dean Michener, NH School Boards Assn: “While we do support the local control intended here, we believe this bill is not necessary, as you have already address this issue with House Bill 276.”

Dean Michener, NH School Boards Assn: “While we do support the local control intended here, we believe this bill is not necessary, as you have already address this issue with House Bill 276.”

Dean Michener added the voice of the New Hampshire School Boards Association to the opposition to SB 101, saying, While we do support the local control intended here, we believe this bill is not necessary, as you have already address this issue with House Bill 276.  And we believe it addresses it in a better […]

Retired teacher Anita Craven: “Parents are thrilled with the progress that Common Core has made in our local schools”

Retired teacher Anita Craven: “Parents are thrilled with the progress that Common Core has made in our local schools”

Anita Craven is a retired teacher who has lived in Easton for 20 years, coming there part time for 40 years before that.  She testified in opposition to SB 101 because it “adds a layer of legislation where none is necessary.”

Community College English instructor Dr. Debra Holloway: “I have seen improved writing skills since the implementation of Common Core Standards”

Community College English instructor Dr. Debra Holloway: “I have seen improved writing skills since the implementation of Common Core Standards”

Dr. Debra Holloway grew up in Exeter and now lives in Rye.  She went to the Exeter public schools, earned BA and MA degrees from UNH and a Ph.D. from the University of Colorado. She is an education researcher, a college instructor and the the mother of a 6th grader at Rye Junior High School. […]

Follow all education bills on the bill tracker

There are almost 70 education bills filed, too many to keep you up to date on along the other posts on the ANHPE site, so we have made a special site called “Education Bills,” where you can track the bills you’re interested in and even get specialized daily emails with everything about those bills, from hearing times to news articles and testimony.

The new site is here and, as you see, it is also the far right item on the menu at the top of this page.  You can “Follow” the site to keep up to the minute or subscribe to newsletters that cover your specific areas of interest.

‘Thank God for New Hampshire’ – EdWeek about the PACE locally managed assessment program

Here in New Hampshire, it’s easy to lose perspective on how important the PACE pilot program is.  Years in preparation, it is the nation’s first step beyond standardized testing.  The four participating districts – Sanborn, Rochester, Epping and Souhegan – are doing hard creative work that will clear the way for other districts in New Hampshire and eventually throughout the country.

That’s why Kentucky education commissioner said, (more…)

Teaching the Next Generation Science Standards With ‘Mysteries’ – EdWeek

New Hampshire’s current science standards are nine years old and will need to be updated soon.  The Governor’s STEM Task Force, including business, teachers, scientists and many others, recommended that the starting point be the widely respected Next Generation Science Standards, based on the National Research Council’s Framework for K-12 Science Education.  So in the coming months, the New Hampshire State Board of Education may begin the process of reviewing the standards.

A recent EdWeek article concisely captures the difference between the NGSS and traditional science teachers: (more…)

Confused about the Common Core? NPR breaks it down.

The debate over the Common Core State Standards has been fraught with myths and misinformation. As New Hampshire considers a variety of bills this legislative session, you might find yourself wondering: What is the Common Core? Why do we need it? NPR breaks down these questions and more:

What is the Common Core? The Common Core State Standards Initiative is the largest-ever attempt in the United States to set unified expectations for what students in kindergarten through 12th grade should know and be able to do in each grade in preparation for college and the workforce. In short, the standards are meant to get every student in America on the same page. Right now, the Common Core standards cover two areas: math and English language arts (writing and reading). They were developed by a group of governors, chief state school officers and education experts from 48 states. To date, 44 states and the District of Columbia have formally adopted the new standards. By Spring of 2015, most of these states plan to administer state tests that have been aligned to the new standards.

Read the rest of the FAQs here.

 

Embracing Common Core as a building block for state standards: A Florida principal’s experience

In a response letter to a worried New York principal, a high school principal in Ocala, Florida wrote of her state’s enthusiastic adoption of Common Core State Standards (CCSS). (more…)

Manchester Board of School Committee votes to adopt statewide test – Union Leader

Sarah Ambrogi and other key board members understood that there was really no choice in the end.  Here is how the Union leader reported the meeting:

MANCHESTER — The Board of School Committee reversed its collision course with state education officials on Wednesday and voted to adopt the Smarter Balanced statewide assessment test.

(more…)

Talk to your child and good things happen – Concord Monitor editorial

There are many important initiatives in New Hampshire to support early childhood development but, so far, with no substantial support from the State.  There are several modest bills pending in the Legislature that serve to put the discussion on the plate.  Today’s lead editorial in the Concord Monitor contributes to the discussion by featuring the innovative Providence Talks program: (more…)

Fluency Without Fear – the Best Ways to Learn Math Facts – by Jo Boaler and others at Stanford

Here is a wonderful piece by Stanford math professor Jo Boaler.  I offer it not as part of the Common Core debate but because it lives in a world so far beyond that debate.  Whether or not you are a math person, so to speak, you will enjoy this. (more…)

Guess What, Mom? Common Core Can Be Good for Your Kindergartener – Erika Sanzi

Here’s a smart and well observed piece on learning to read:

I am always torn when I read pieces like that of Sarah Blaine, who shared her views on the Common Core State Standards for kindergartners. The gist of her piece, published on Valerie Strauss’s Answer Sheet blog, is that based on her personal experience with her two daughters, she sees the standards as “developmentally inappropriate” for kindergartners.

(more…)

James Milgram: “Are you going to believe me or your lyin’ eyes”

No.  Dr. Milgram didn’t say that.  But he might as well have.  Next time you hear some theoretical debate about whether the Common Core is developmentally appropriate, think of this video.

See more here.

Our number system: a no-go-zone for the Tea Party – repost from Bill McCallum, one of the authors of the math standards

Bill McCallum, lead author of the Common Core standards for math, interviewed here on Fox News, has a great way of talking about the standards.  Although I would have passed on the tea party reference, here’s a post from his blog, reposted with permission. (more…)

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